STATE AFFILIATE OF THE AMERICAN DENTAL ASSISTANTS ASSOCIATION

News



  • 17 Apr 2019 12:00 AM | Anonymous
    You undoubtedly noticed, if you attended the Oregon Dental Conference, that there were some renovation going on and there were definitely some changes this year compared to previous years.  Thus the theme: "Under Construction".
     
    In spite of the enhancement project the conference was well attended.  Excellent courses and enjoyed by all. 

     


    Enjoying the conference were students from Chemeketa Community College


  • 06 Mar 2019 12:00 AM | Anonymous


  • 14 Feb 2019 12:00 AM | Anonymous

    Who was St. Valentine?
     

    The Catholic Church recognizes at least three different saints named Valentine or Valentinus, all of whom were martyred.  One legend contends that Valentine was a priest who served during the third century in Rome.  When Emperor Claudius II decided that single men were better soldiers than those with wives and families, he outlawed marriage for young men.  Valentine, realizing the injustice of the decree, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret.  When Valentine’s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death.  Other stories suggest that Valentine may have been killed for attempting to help Christians escape harsh Roman prisons, where they were often beaten and tortured.  According to one legend, an imprisoned Valentine actually sent the first “valentine” greeting  himself, after he fell in love with a young girl-possibly his jailer's daughter who visited him during his confinement.  Before his death, it is alleged that he wrote her a letter signed “From your Valentine,” an expression that is still in use today.  Although the truth behind the Valentine legends is murky, the stories all emphasize his appeal as a sympathetic, heroic and most importantly romantic figure.  By the Middle Ages, perhaps thanks to this reputation, Valentine would become on of the most popular saints in England and France.


    February is also American Heart Month.
     
    According to the MMWR, heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States, and someone in the United States has a heart attack every 40 seconds.
     
    February is American Heart Month, an ideal time to remind all adults to focus on their heart and encourage them, their families, friends and communities to learn the important signs and symptoms of a heart attack and how to respond.  Recognizing that someone might be having a heart attack is crucial for optimizing access to lifesaving emergency cardiac care.
     
    Five common symptoms of a heart attack are:
    1. Pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck or back
    2. Feeling weak, lightheaded or faint
    3. Chest pain or discomfort
    4. Pain or discomfort in the arms or shoulder
    5. Shortness of breath
     
    If someone is suspected to be having a heart attack 9-1-1 should be called immediately.
     
    MMWR reports the percentage of persons who are aware of all five heart attack symptoms increased from 39.6% in 2008 to 50.2% in 2017.

    I’m sure you all do an excellent job instructing your patients on the importance of good oral hygiene but don’t forget to mention how that plaque and calculus can be detrimental to their heart. 


  • 25 Jan 2019 9:21 AM | Anonymous


    JANUARY 2023


    PATIENT CARE & SAFETY ARE AT RISK

    The Oregon Dental Assistants Association is aware that there is a shortage of qualified dental assistants in Oregon.  The shortage is not going to change if the rules and standards set forth by the Oregon Board of Dentistry (OBD), Division 42 Dental Assisting, are eliminated.

     
    "The shortage is not going to change if the rules and standards set forth... are eliminated."

    Eliminating the rules or standards will allow unqualified people to provide dental care.


    "The shortage is not going to change if the rules and standards set forth... are eliminated."
    Eliminating the rules or standards will allow unqualified people to provide dental care.
     


    The standards in Division 42 were approved by the Board of Dentistry and dental professionals, serving the field of dentistry by providing safe and quality patient care for over 50 years.  Providing standards for Dental Assistants, OBD is promoting oral health and protecting all patients in the field of dentistry as well as promoting the Oregon Radiation Protection Service Agency, ODAA and OBD Mission Statements.

     

    The world has just gone through three years of uncertainty for dental offices, dental professional and health care facilities. As the world becomes more stable, we as dental professionals need to assure our patients that dentistry will provide quality care in a safe environment.  Taking away rules and standards will not make a difference in the shortage of dental assistants. Eliminating the rules or standards will allow unqualified people to provide dental care. As dental professionals we owe it to our patients to provide quality care safely.

    X-rays in a dental office are being performed by a qualified dental assistant under General Supervision.  “General Supervision means that a supervising dentist has examined and diagnosed the patient and provided subsequent instructions to be performed by the assistive personnel but does not require that the dentist be physically present in the treatment facility.”  Patients understand that they can trust the person that is exposing their radiographs and that that person has the proper qualifications to do so without harm.  Division 42 rules provide the proper direction for dental assistants to prove that they are qualified to successfully perform tasks where patients could otherwise be harmed by improper treatment.  Division 42 requirements for dental assistants provide clarification on what can be done by qualified dental assistants to perform tasks on patients safely.

    The Radiology Health and Safety Exam is the foundation for the dental assisting rules in Division 42 and the safety of patients.

    The following certificates require that a dental assistant hold a Certification of Radiologic Proficiency (OAR 818-042-0060), complete a course of instruction approved by the Oregon Board of Dentistry, successfully pass an exam, and successfully prove competency by completing tasks clinically:

    1. EFDA
    2. EFODA
    3. Sealants
    4. Soft Reline
    5. Place retraction Material sub gingivally
    6. Restorative
    The Oregon Dental Assistants Association wants to thank OBD for recognizing the need for Chapter 818, Division 42, 818-042-0050, Rule 813-042-0050: Taking of X-rays- Exposing of Radiographic Images, as a way of promoting safety for all dental patients.

    However, a few Oregon Dentists have placed House Bill 2996 for consideration and if the Bill passes it will eliminate the required Radiology Exam, therefore jeopardizing patient quality of care and safety.

    Removal of the Radiology Health and Safety Exam will jeopardize patient quality of care and safety.

    The ODAA does not think that changing or eliminating any of the rules set forth in Division 42 will solve the shortage concerns.  If the rules are eliminated, it will likely increase the shortage and allow unqualified dental assistants to perform tasks on patients.

    The real shortage started due to COVID-19 and has continued to increase with the lack of support for retention and education as well as not providing a living wage for Dental Assistants.

    ODAA Opposes Oregon House Bill 2996!

    The OBD will be having a hearing soon to address this topic and I want to encourage you to come and speak out against the removal of the Radiology Health and Safety Exam. Please take the time to read House Bill 2996 and write to your representative in Salem to repeal the bill.

    Professional Dental Assistants are an important part of the dental team who encourage and embrace standards and education in order to provide quality safe patient care for their patients.  

    Sincerely,

    Bonnie Marshall, RDA, CDA, EFDA, EFODA, MADAA, BS

    ODAA President 


    MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD!


    OBD Mission Statement:

    “The Mission of the Oregon Board of Dentistry is to promote quality oral health care and protect all communities in the State of Oregon by equitably regulating dental professionals.  The authority and responsibilities are obtained in the Oregon Statues.”

    ODAA Mission Statement:

    “The Oregon Dental Assistant’s purpose is to promote the careers of dental professionals which will enable the working individuals to promote safe and quality patient care.  This Association will represent the dental assistant professionals in legislative activities, mandated health and safety regulations and provide progressive continuing education.  The Oregon Dental Assistants Association membership services will provide information, resource and reference materials, publications and other benefits.”

  • 17 Dec 2018 12:00 AM | Anonymous

    From the Executive Board of the Oregon Dental Assistants Association.

  • 16 Nov 2018 12:00 AM | Anonymous

    A special greeting of Thanksgiving.
    Time to express to you our sincere appreciation
    for your confidence and loyalty.
    We are deeply thankful and extend to you our best wishes
    for a happy and healthy Thanksgiving Day.

     
    ODAA Executive Board


  • 09 Nov 2018 12:00 AM | Anonymous

    IN MEMORY
     
    Cindy Phillips spent her life supporting her family, friends, the dentists she worked for and the patients she cared for. She continuously dedicated herself to the task at hand; dental assisting,teaching and training dental professionals to be the best they could be.

    Cindy was diagnosed with cancer in October 2016.  She bravely endured many rounds of treatment to live beyond the initial prediction of less than one year.

    Cindy found gratification in making sure that every detail was addressed and that every student was given the opportunity to learn, even if it meant providing additional time outside the classroom. She was tough but kind and supportive to all. Many students were successful because of Cindy and her ability to help students understand difficult concepts. She was relentless in her dedication to making sure that all the students received the education they deserved.

    Cindy spent many years of her life facing the challenges of being a dental assistant. She wanted more for the profession and especially those students who were committed to working hard. Dental assisting is a unique profession where one has the opportunity to provide support to the dentist and the dental patient but it requires a strong work ethic, something Cindy spoke of often and instilled in the students she taught.

    Her family asks for donations in memory of Cindy to the Cindy Phillips Memorial Scholarship Fund Business Account at any branch of On Point Credit Union.  The Cindy Phillips Memorial Scholarship is meant to provide financial assistance to a student who aspires to become a professional dental assistant and has the qualities that Cindy demonstrated throughout her career; dedicated, committed, supportive, hard-working, kind,respectful and a rule follower.

    If you think you fit this description and are wanting to become a dental assistant in the State of Oregon, please complete the attached application to be considered by the Cindy Phillips Memorial Scholarship Selection Committee.


    Applications must be type-written and post marked no later than February 15, 2019.
    Cindy Phillips Memorial Dental Assisting Scholarship.

     
    Purpose
    The Cindy Phillips Memorial Scholarship was established in memory of Cindy Phillips, CDA, EFDA, AAS, a career dental assistant who was a dedicated health care provider, mentor and teacher. This scholarship honors Cindy and her commitment to dental assisting education and to students who believe in working hard to become a dental assistant; a career to be proud of.
     
    This scholarship will be awarded to a student who is currently enrolled in a dental assisting program and is in “good standing” or has been accepted into a dental assisting program approved by the Cindy Phillips Memorial Dental Assisting Scholarship Committee.
     
    Application Criteria
    To be considered for the Cindy Phillips Memorial Scholarship, applicants must:
    • Be a high school graduate or hold a GED Certificate.
    • Complete the scholarship application.
    • Complete an in-person interview with the Scholarship Committee.
    • Provide confirmation from an employer of at least 1 year of full-time (at least 35 hours per week) work experience within the past 5 years.
     
    Applicant Submissions
    Applicants must submit the following materials:
     1. Letter of Purpose and Intent
    2. Completed and signed application and scholarship agreement
    3. Two letters of recommendation from educator, employer, colleague, etc.
    4. Dental Office observation confirmation letter with dentist signature (=>8 hours)
     
    Selected Applicant
    Once the applicant is selected, they must:
    • Provide the name and contact information of the dental assisting program they are currently enrolled in or plan to apply for.
     
    Award Selection and Amount
    Once the applicant is selected the funds will be applied toward the approved Dental Assisting Program tuition and fees. The amount of this scholarship will be $500 to $1000.00.
     
    All application materials must be submitted in one email (either as one PDF attachment or as multiple attachments to one email). The application, letter of purpose and intent and letters of recommendation must be typed. Handwritten materials will not be accepted other than the signature if you are unable to sign electronically. Incomplete applications (missing one or more of the application items) will not be considered. All scholarship materials must be submitted by February 15, 2019 to Anchor:smithandjorgensen@gmail.com with the subject line titled, Cindy Phillips Memorial Scholarship.
     

    Cindy Phillips Memorial Dental Assisting Scholarship
    Personal Data
    Name_______________________________________________________
    `               (last) (First) (Middle)
    Address
    ______________________________________________________________
                     (Street/PO Box/Suite)
    Address
    ___________________________________________________________
                     (City) (State) (Zip code)
    Email address_________________________ Cell phone (      )____________

    Scholarship Agreement
    If awarded the Cindy Phillips Memorial Dental Assisting Scholarship I understand and agree the funds are to be applied toward dental assisting education and fees.
    Signature X____________________________Date X_________

    Cindy Phillips Memorial Dental Assisting Scholarship
    Letter of Purpose and Intent
    Your letter of purpose and intent should describe your interest in becoming a dental assistant and why you believe this is a good career choice for you. (250 to 1000 type-written words)

  • 14 Oct 2018 12:00 AM | Anonymous


    The temperatures are dropping and crisp cool air is arriving.  The days become shorter and trees are changing color.  We notice orange and black Halloween decorations adorning yards and we are decorating our homes for the occasion.  It’s the perfect time to pass out toothbrushes along with a reminder on how to brush and floss after consuming that delicious candy.  We don’t want cavities!
     
    Maybe your educational reminder could include some terms and meanings – helping parents as well as children:
    • Plaque  -  PLAK
    • Bacteria  -  bak-TEER-ee-uh
    • Gingivitis  -  jin-juh-VI-tis
     
    We’re lucky that we know so much now about taking care of our teeth.  While you are brushing your teeth today, think about what people used long ago to clean teeth:
    • Ground-up chalk or charcoal
    • Lemon juice
    • Ashes
    • Tobacco and honey mixed together
    Yuck!
     
    It was only about 100 years ago that someone created a minty cream to help clean teeth.  Not long after that, the toothpaste tube was invented, made of metal.  Tooth brushing became popular during World War II.  The U.S. Army gave brushes and toothpaste to all soldiers, and they learned to brush twice a day. 
     
    Other topics you might want to add to your “reminder”.
    • Toothpaste the size of a pea is all that is needed. 
    • Brush at least twice a day.  After breakfast and before bedtime are usually good times.
    • Brush all your teeth not just the front ones.
    • Spend at least 2 to 3 minutes each time you brush.  A little timer might be helpful.
    • Depending on the child’s age and dexterity they can learn to floss properly.
    • Gentle brushing of the tongue
    • Visit their dentist twice a year.
    • Be diet mindful.  Lots of fruits and vegetables and water instead of soda.
     
    These ideas should help make happy smiles.


  • 20 Jul 2018 12:00 AM | Anonymous


     Sheila Pulanco Russell's Facebook Post to the Wise...

    It’s definitely summer time and many of you are anxious for a vacation or even just a few days off.  After all, you have worked hard and could use a little rest and relaxation. 
     
    Have you ever come home from a vacation, lengthy seminar, dental conference or maybe a weekend away with the family and noticed your digital clocks flashing the wrong time?
     
    You quickly realize that you had a power outage while you were away, but it’s basically impossible to tell when it occurred or how long it lasted.  It’s therefore also impossible to tell just how long the food in your freezer may have thawed, gotten destroyed, and then frozen again…………Or is it?
     
    In connection with Hurricane Matthews that swept over parts of the United States, a woman named Sheila Pulanco Russell shared a clever trick on her Facebook wall with anyone who was forced to evacuate their home. But the trick is also good to know in case of any prolonged departure from your home – and will ease your mind about whether or not the food in your freezer is good to eat – or best be thrown out. 
     
    The trick lies in the magical combination of three simple but effective tools everyone already has at home:  a mug, a coin and some tap water.


    The great tip is called “the one cup tip”.  You put a cup of water in your freezer.  Freeze it solid and then put a quarter on top of it and leave it in your freezer.  That way when you come back you can tell if your food went completely bad and just refroze or if it stayed frozen while you were gone.  

    If the quarter has fallen to the bottom of the cup that means all of the food defrosted and you should throw it out.  If the quarter is either on the top or in the middle of the cup,  then your food may still be okay.  

    It would also be a great idea to leave this in your freezer all the time and if you lose power for any reason you will have this tip to fall back on.  

     

    Have a safe and fun summer!


  • 22 Jun 2018 12:00 AM | Anonymous



    The fourth of July, also known as Independence Day, celebrates the day that America declared its independence from Great Britain.

    The fourth of July was officially declared a federal holiday in 1941, but the country has celebrated this day since Thursday July 4, 1776.  It’s a day to spend celebrating patriotism with a wide range of activities;  firework displays, parades, concerts and barbecues.

    The United States celebrates with fireworks as a tradition continued down through history since the initial year.  Thirteen fireworks were set off to symbolize the 13 states of the union.  It evolved as more states joined the union.

    The main signees who drafted the Declaration of Independence were Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, and John Adams.

    Thomas Jefferson – the principal author.  Jefferson’s memorandum books indicate that dental care was a regular part of his routine.  When 81 years old, Jefferson reported to a friend that he had lost only one tooth, with “the rest continuing sound”.

    Benjamin Franklin – History tells us that a tooth was pulled from the mouth of Benjamin Franklin sometime between 1706 – 1790.  The tooth is inside a gold acorn with some loose fibrous packing around it.  The tooth is broken in at least two parts but has been identified as probably a lower left second molar.  Apparently one side of the tooth was broken off, possibly before it was pulled.  This acorn-tooth was passed down through his many generations.
    John Adams – the second U.S. President March 4, 1797 to March 4, 1801.  When Adams lost his teeth, he refused to wear false ones.  As a result, he had a lisp when speaking.  In later years Adams had trouble speaking. 

    56 Delegates eventually signed the Declaration of Independence. 

    The Executive Board of the ODAA wish you and your family a happy and healthy July 4th.


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